Job Posting: Curator at the Adirondack Museum

10653432_10152630975063076_5711327568720467904_n

Do you have an MA in Museum Studies, and an interest in American history, specifically maritime history and material culture? Then take a look at the job posting for a new curator position at the Adirondack Museum! I figured that this might be a good place to share such a posting, there seems to be a lot of museum-minded individuals and history buffs who are in some of my blogging circles.

Job title: Curator
Department: Collections

Job description: 

The Adirondack Museum is currently seeking a creative, highly motivated individual with strong organizational skills, professional demeanor and great attention to detail to work with the Collections Department. Under the direction of the Chief Curator, this position will perform responsibilities related to documentation, expansion, interpretation, care, and preservation of the collections in exhibitions, programs, publications and other formats that present the story of the Adirondacks. The Curator has primary responsibility for the museum’s boat and transportation collection, and will contribute to interpreting the intersection between people, technology and the environment. The position offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits. The Adirondack Museum is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Qualifications: 

Candidates must have a master’s degree in Museum Studies, and possess a thorough knowledge of American history, including history of technology. A familiarity with maritime history and material culture is preferred. Excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills as well as strong computer skills (Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook) are required. Knowledge of museum cataloging techniques and museum software are strongly preferred. The individual must be able to manage time efficiently, work on multiple projects and deadlines, and have the ability to work under pressure.

Compensation and benefits: Position is full-time, year-round, with benefits.

To apply: 

Fill out application here.

Send completed application, cover letter, resume, and salary requirements to: HRDept@adkmuseum.org

Or mail to:

Adirondack Museum
Attn: Colleen Sage, Human Resources Mgr.
PO Box 99, Blue Mt. Lake, NY 12812

10931304_10155114877195023_9150270720458709519_n

Our Mission

The Adirondack Museum expands public understanding of Adirondack history and the relationship between people and the Adirondack wilderness, fostering informed choices for the future.

Our History 

Since 1957, the Adirondack Museum has shared the history of the people who have lived, worked and played in the Adirondack Park. The history of the very place on which the museum sits mirrors the history of the Adirondacks: from lumber camp to summer hotel to museum, it embodies the transformation of the Adirondacks from mineral and lumber resource to resort to recreation getaway.

The museum’s story begins in 1867 when Connecticut farmer Miles Talcott Merwin acquired 11,230-acres in the Adirondacks, including most of Blue Mountain. Six years later, Merwin and his son, Miles Tyler Merwin, traveled here “in order to look over some prospects for lumbering.” After reaching Glens Falls by train, they hiked for five days through dense forest to reach Blue Mountain Lake.

In spring, 1874, Tyler Merwin “employed a crew of men to build a set of shanties, clear up some land, and plant some potatoes to help feed a crew of lumbermen the next winter.” Merwin and his men logged two tracts of land, one on Blue Mountain and another around nearby Tirrell Pond, three miles to the north.

In the last quarter of the 1800s, the Adirondacks became a popular vacation destination. Wealthy summer tourists came to spend several weeks or more each summer, escaping the heat and smog of urban life. Tyler Merwin put up overnight guests, first in crude rooms in the lumber camp, then in a log “annex.” In 1880, he built a large frame hotel with a broad veranda overlooking the lake. By 1907, Merwin’s Blue Mountain House hotel could accommodate as many as 100 guests.

True to his Puritan background, Merwin banned the use of alcohol and tobacco on hotel grounds, although he did offer amusements including “ping-pong, piano, Victrola, radio, and when occasion demands, square and regular dancing.”

The Blue Mountain House continued as a hotel into the twentieth century. On Saturday July 3, 1948, then owner William L. Wessels invited “a group of men and women interested in the history of the Adirondacks and the preservation of mementos of the past” to meet. Together, they formed The Adirondack Historical Association. Granted a charter by the New York State Legislature the following year, the group made plans to build a museum in Blue Mountain Lake. In 1954, the Adirondack Historical Association purchased the Blue Mountain House property from Wessels, and began construction on a new museum building.

The Adirondack Museum opened on August 4, 1957, after two years of construction and collecting. Director Robert Bruce Inverarity described the new museum’s mission as “ecological in nature, showing the history of man’s relation to the Adirondacks.” The first objects collected were from the Blue Mountain Lake area. The exhibits featured the Marion River Carry Railroad engine and passenger car, the steamboat Osprey, a stagecoach, several horse-drawn vehicles, a birch bark canoe and dioramas depicting various aspects of life in the Adirondacks.10383098_10154907973305023_5918027827769880856_n

Since then, the Adirondack Museum collection has expanded to include artifacts representing community life from all over the Adirondack region. The museum actively collects, preserves and exhibits objects that were made or used by Adirondackers. These objects are historical documents that tell how people live, work, and play on the Adirondack landscape. Most of these objects have been donated by Adirondackers who want to preserve and share their family and community history. There are now some 30,000 objects, more than 70,000 photographs, 9,511 books, and 800 pages of original manuscript materials housed and exhibited at the Adirondack Museum. The museum is still collecting and those numbers are growing.

The natural world is “a community to which we all belong” and nowhere is this more consciously recognized than in the Adirondack Park. The Adirondack Museum continues to bring to life the history of man’s relationship to this landscape so we may make better-informed decisions about the future of this very special place.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s