Adirondack Museum Cabin Fever Sundays series: “Adirondack Outlaws”

HCanton Eddie_900ere’s the press release for the second installation in the Adirondack Museum‘s Cabin Fever Sundays winter lecture series, “Adirondack Outlaws” with Adirondack Life Magazine’s senior editor, Niki Kourofsky.

From North Creek to Blue Mountain Lake to Glens Falls, the Adirondack Museum’s “Cabin Fever Sundays” series continues to present a wide-ranging look at life in the Adirondacks – yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Explore a variety of fascinating topics, from songs of the historic Hudson River to the experiences of the Abenaki in the Adirondacks.

Adirondack Outlaws

In the second installment of the series, Niki Kourofsky will take listeners on a rip-roaring ride through Adirondack history, introducing a cast of infamous scofflaws and scallywags, and a few murderous maniacs, that lend a new meaning to “Forever Wild.” “Adirondack Outlaws” will begin at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 1, in the Museum Auditorium, 9097 State Route 30, Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812.

Admission is free for museum members, students, and children; $5 for non-members. Refreshments will be served, and Niki will sign copies of her just-published book, Adirondack Outlaws: Bad Boys and Lawless Ladies after the program in the Museum Store.

mugshot_900During “Adirondack Outlaws” you will follow Niki through the misadventures of the Windfall Gang, a pack of bumbling thieves and jail-breakers operating out of Wells, N.Y. Meet slick Canton Eddie, the most prolific safe-cracker the North Country has ever seen. Hear the outlandish tales spun by convicted wife murderer Henry De Bosnys as he awaited the hangman’s noose, and discover the shadowy culture that terrorized immigrants in nonchalantly policed mining towns. Niki will also discuss the difficulties of researching and interpreting such slippery historical characters.

About the Presenter

P1050626_edited-1-1_900Niki Kourofsky holds a bachelor’s degree in history, with a concentration in museum studies, and a master’s degree in writing and editing. She is currently a senior editor at Adirondack Life, a regional magazine exploring the people, places, and storied history of New York’s six-million-acre Adirondack Park. Her articles “Frontier Town” and “Grass Roots,” won silver and gold, respectively, from the International Regional Magazine Association. Niki’s Adirondack roots run generations deep, grounded in the ore sand of the one-time mining community of Lyon Mountain.

Coming up . . .
Future installments of the Cabin Fever Sundays series will include:

Of Time and The River: Songs of the Historic Hudson River” with Linda Russell
1:30 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 8
Tannery Pond Community Center, 228 Main St., North Creek, NY 12853
Admission is free to the public, thanks to the “Speakers in the Humanities” program of the New York Council for the Humanities, with the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Refreshments will be served.
Trace life along the Hudson as heard in folk ballads, Erie Canal ditties, and dance tunes accompanied by guitar, penny whistle, and hammered and mountain dulcimers.

Life Speeds Up: Robert Fulton and a Changing New York” with Robert Arnold III
1:30 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 22
Museum Auditorium, 9097 State Route 30, Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812
Admission is free to the public, thanks to the “Speakers in the Humanities” program of the New York Council for the Humanities, with the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Refreshments will be served.
Follow the legacy of Robert Fulton, the creator of the first commercially successful steamboat, and find out how the advent of steam power influenced modern day maritime innovation.

Mohawk Dance and Cultural Presentation” with Akhwatsire
1:30 p.m., Sunday, Mar. 1
Museum Auditorium, 9097 State Route 30, Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812
Admission is free for museum members, students, and children; $5 for non-members. Refreshments will be served.
See Joshua Angus Sargent and Natasha Smoke Santiago as they share traditional Mohawk songs, dances, and stories.

Mountain Folk Music with Adirondack Musician Alex Smith
1:30 p.m., Sunday, Mar. 15
The Hyde Collection, 161 Warren St., Glens Falls, NY 12801
Admission is free for Adirondack Museum members; non-members’ admission is $15 ($13 for seniors) and includes admission to
The Hyde Collection. Refreshments will be served.
Experience the music of the Adirondacks past and present with Long Lake native Alex Smith, whose music brings a fresh, new sound to North Country roots.

Wolves: The Role of a Keystone Predator in Nature” with Steve and Wendy Hall of the Adirondack Wildlife Refuge Rehabilitation Center
1:30 p.m., Sunday, Mar. 22
Museum Auditorium, 9097 State Route 30, Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812
Admission is free for museum members, students, and children; $5 for non-members. Refreshments will be served.
Learn how wolf packs defend their territories, meet a live wolf, learn what kinds of wolves live in the Adirondacks, what their behavioral displays indicate, and much more.

The Abenaki in the Adirondacks: Diverse Experiences from the 18th Century to the 21st Centurywith Christopher Roy and an Abenaki panel
1:30 p.m., Sunday, Apr. 19
Museum Auditorium, 9097 State Route 30, Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812
Admission is free for museum members, students, and children; $5 for non-members. Refreshments will be served.
Hear from several Abenaki panelists about their families’ experiences in the Adirondacks and anthropologist Christopher Roy, who will highlight important Abenaki-related collections at the Adirondack Museum.

For more information

A complete description of all the “Cabin Fever Sundays” programs can be found online at www.adkmuseum.org/exhibits_and_events/special_events

The “Cabin Fever Sundays” series is supported by a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, with two free programs made possible through support from the “Speakers in the Humanities” program, with the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this series do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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